Kratom continues to come under fire, most recently with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issuing a kratom “advisory.” With such an uncertain future, it’s now more important than ever before for kratom enthusiasts to speak out in support of mitragyna speciosa!

The American Kratom Association (AKA) has drafted an open letter to acting U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Director Robert W. Patterson, urging the agency to conduct its own 8-factor analysis of kratom and its properties. The study would “test the credibility of the scheduling recommendation submitted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.”

Click here to read and sign the AKA’s open letter.

Why is the AKA Promoting an Independent 8-Factor Kratom Study?

Kratom proponents argue that an objective scientific study will make it clear that kratom is a safe botanical; one that holds great potential for use as a treatment for a wide variety of ailments and conditions. Enthusiasts often point out that this botanical that has been used for generations by native Southeast Asian cultures to treat everything from insomnia and anxiety, to pain, lethargy, and depression. This stands in sharp contrast to the FDA’s claims that suggest kratom is a “gateway drug ” or substitute for opioids.

“In its enactment of the Controlled Substances Act, Congress has wisely required the DEA to do its own independent review on scheduling recommendations submitted by the FDA to provide a second opinion on important substance scheduling issues. That second opinion is desperately needed in the evaluation of kratom because the science directly refutes the FDA claims,” the AKA’s open letter states.

The AKA and countless kratom enthusiasts are calling for this independent analysis due to what they believe is a woefully inaccurate representation by the FDA. For instance, the FDA suggested that kratom has “narcotic opioid-like” potential for abuse. It was also stated that the substance is primarily used to “get high.” But heaps of scientific evidence and thousands of personal anecdotes suggest that kratom is, in fact, a rather poor opioid substitute—particularly for anyone who is seeking a high. This is just one contradiction that has thousands of kratom consumers concerned.

Notably, the DEA has already been supplied with an independent 8-factor kratom analysis performed by Jack Henningfield, Ph.D. Henningfield is regarded as one of the nation’s leading experts on issues surrounding substance abuse, addiction and substance safety.

The AKA is also encouraging the DEA Director to consider four additional studies that “clearly demonstrate the harm that will be done by any scheduling order on kratom.”

As many recall, the DEA previously sought an “emergency” scheduling for kratom which would have placed the plant in the same category as heroin and cocaine. This led to tremendous outcry amongst kratom enthusiasts, who came out in droves to sign petitions, write letters and—most importantly—share their personal experiences with kratom. Thousands came forward to detail how kratom had positively impacted their lives. Ultimately, the emergency scheduling was halted.

How Can You Help Keep Kratom Legal?

But kratom’s legal status still remains uncertain. Several states have already banned kratom, including Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, and Wisconsin. What’s more, the FDA is actively detaining many kratom shipments to the U.S., which is clearly a concern for those who favor and support the sale of kratom.

For this reason, we encourage you to take a few minutes to sign and share the American Kratom Association’s open letter to DEA Director Robert W. Patterson.

Click here to read the letter.

You can also make a difference by writing to local and federal lawmakers. Share your positive experiences with kratom and how it has transformed your life. Also, encourage legislators to support an additional scientific investigation into kratom and its effects. Many believe that this hard scientific evidence is the key to maintaining kratom’s legal status.

Click here to learn more about contacting congressmen and senators.

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